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Winters Surname

The Winters line needs more research. Any information before the late 1700s is purely speculative. This line is probably English or Dutch in origin.

Our earliest provable Winters ancestor, Silas Winters, was most likely the son of Obadiah Winters and his second wife Phebe Gordon. They lived at Waterbury, Connecticut from about 1766 to about 1772. In about 1772, they may have moved to Vermont, and some of the family eventually moved on to Canada. That Obadiah Winters may have been connected to Obadias Winter and Susanna DuPuis of Staten Island, New York who had at least 4 children between 1700-1719. He may also be connected to Obadiah Winter and Margaret Cromwell of Woodbridge, New Jersey.


1st Generation:

Obadiah Winters was born circa 1720. He died after 1772.

There is little known about the early life or origins of Obadiah Winters. He first appears in known records 1750 in Branford, Connecticut; but he was probably not from there originally. My wild guess (based on names) is that Obadiah was related somehow to Obadias Winter and his wife Susanna DePuy who lived at Staten Island, New York; and had several children between 1700 and 1719. An Obadiah Winters was still there as late as 1739. He also might have been related to an Obediah Winter (alias Grabum) who married Margaret Cromwell and died in 1675 in Woodbridge, New Jersey; leaving children including Josiah and Obediah Winter Jr.

"Our" Obadiah Winters was married to Hannah Butler, probably in Branford, Connecticut, at an unknown date but probably before 1746. In 1750, he purchased land in Branford from "Hannah Scarit" his mother-in-law. While living in Branford, Obadiah served in the French and Indian War. He served for a short time in 1757 before deserting, and again in 1761. Obadiah and his family apparently stayed in Branford until about 1766. In that year, Obadiah purchased land from Aaron Harrison in Waterbury, Connecticut. While living in Waterbury, Obadiah remarried to Phebe Gordon. In 1772, Obadiah sold his land in Waterbury to William Rowley, his wife's step-father. His whereabouts after this is somewhat of a mystery.

During the late 1770s, the family apparently lived at Pawlet in Rutland County, Vermont. They also apparently lived at one point at Otter Creek in Vermont. Sometime in the late 1780s, they moved to South Hero, in what is now Grand Isle County, Vermont. In 1790, Obadiah Winters was enumerated in South Hero with a family of 10 individuals. It is not clear whether this census enumeration refers to this Obadiah (born c. 1720) or to his son of the same name (born c. 1750). The fact that no known contemporary record refers to either of them by Sr. or Jr. implies that the elder Obadiah was by that time deceased or that they did not live together in the same area. My guess is that the elder Obadiah died in Vermont sometime during the 1770s or 1780s. It is possible though that he survived into the 1790s and may have moved with his son's family to Canada.

Obadiah married first Hannah Butler before 1750, probably in Branford, New Haven Co., Connecticut. She was born on April 9, 1716 in Branford, New Haven Co., Connecticut. She died before 1768.

In 1750, Obadiah Winters purchased land from Hannah Scarrett, who was referred to as his mother-in-law. This led many researchers to assume that Obadiah's wife was Abigail Scarrett, or another unknown daughter of Richard and Hannah Scarrett. In actuality, Obadiah's wife was Hannah Butler, daughter of Hannah Scarrett by her first marriage to Silas Butler.

Additionally, most researchers assume Hannah died before 1768, when her husband remarried to Phebe Gordon. However, there is no proof that the Obadiah who married Phebe Gordon in 1768 was her husband - it could have been her son Obadiah Winters Jr.

They had the following children:
1 Mary Winters was born circa 1746, probably in Branford, New Haven Co., Connecticut. She died on July 6, 1836 in Waterbury (now Naugatuck), New Haven Co., Connecticut. She is buried in the Gunntown Cemetery, Naugatuck, New Haven Co., Connecticut.
She married Joseph Nichols on December 28, 1772 in Waterbury, New Haven Co., Connecticut.
They had children including: Nabby, Isaac, Lavinia and Mary Nichols.

While most of Mary's family moved to Vermont during the 1770s, Mary remained behind in Waterbury, Connecticut - where she resided until her death.

2 Hannah Winters was born circa 1748. She married Timothy Porter on August 27, 1767 in Waterbury, New Haven Co., Connecticut.
The Waterbury vital records list her maiden name as both Winters and Andruss (Andrews). Unclear if she is really connected to this family.
3 Obadiah Winters was born circa 1750. He died after 1836 in Quebec, Canada.
He married Mary "Polly" "Molly" Fletcher, probably late 1770s in Rutland County, Vermont. She was born on June 29, 1757 in Salisbury, Litchfield Co., Connecticut.
They had the following children:
Ebenezer F. Winters (c. 1779-aft. 1851)
Abigail Winters (1783-1864)
md. Benjamin Root
There is no poof that Abigail was the daughter of Obadiah and Polly Winters, but I have placed her here because she named her son Obadiah W. Root, presumably in honor of her father. Abigail married Benjamin Root in about 1800. In the first 15 years of marriage, they lived at various times in North Hero, Vermont and in Canada. They later lived in Ohio, Illinois and Kentucky.
Peter Obadiah Winters (1786-1864)
Mary "Polly" Winters (c. 1790-1870)
md. Erastus Smith
There is no proof that Mary was the daughter of Obadiah and Mary, but she is placed here because she named one of her sons Cotton Smith, presumably in honor of her maternal grandfather Cotton Fletcher.
Henry Winters (c. 1790-c. 1866)
md. Eliza Perkins
Henry and his family lived in Ontario, Canada. Sometime between 1838 and 1841, they moved to Ohio. Then sometime between 1845 and 1848, they moved to Washington County, Wisconsin, where they remained.
Cotton Fletcher Winters (1795-1886)
md. 1st Ann Morrison
md. 2nd Sarah E.
There is no proof that Cotton was the son of Obadiah and Mary, but he is placed here because it is assumed he was named after his maternal grandfather, Cotton Fletcher.

Obadiah Winters may have been married to someone else before Mary Fletcher. In 1777-1779, Obadiah was involved in a court case in Pawlet, Rutland County, Vermont in which he renounced his wife and she was ordered to jail, but she escaped with a child and a black velvet cloak. (Unclear if this case refers to Obadiah, or to his father).

Obadiah served in the Revolutionary War while living in Vermont, between 1778-1780. Obadiah married Mary Fletcher probably during the late 1770s or early 1780s. They may have lived at Poultney, Rutland County, Vermont during the 1780s. Obadiah and his family then settled in South Hero, Vermont during the late 1780s; where they were living in 1790. Sometime during the 1790s, Obadiah had plans to move to Canada. In 1797, they sold their land in South Hero but may have moved away before then. They settled off of the Ottawa River in the Quebec county of Argenteuil. They settled at either Saint Andrew (Saint Andre) or Grenville. He and his wife probably remained there until their deaths, but some of his children apparently returned to America. Some additional children may be listed under "unknown father" Winters, below.

4 Abigail Winters died after 1771.
In 1771, an Abigail Winters was listed as a teacher in "Judd's Meadow" District in Waterbury, Connecticut. Because Obadiah Winters' family was the only known Winters family in Waterbury in that time period, it is assumed she must have been related to the family. Assumption is that she was probably born in the early 1750s, and thus the daughter of Obadiah Winters by his first wife Hannah Butler. No further information.
5 Timothy Winters
Some researchers list Timothy Winters as a son of Obadiah Winters and his first wife (Hannah Butler). I do not know of any contemporary source that suggests a relationship between Timothy and Obadiah Winters. If so, he was probably the Timothy Winters who married Sarah and had children including Asaph, Betsey and Minos. They lived at Clarendon, Vermont in 1785-1786; then St. Albans, Vermont between 1788-1790; then were at Highgate, Vermont in 1798.
Obadiah married second Phebe Gordon on April 25, 1768 in Waterbury, New Haven Co., Connecticut. She was born on October 14, 1751 in Waterbury, New Haven Co., Connecticut. She died at an unknown location.
Phebe was the daughter of James Gordon and Sarah Smith, who lived at Wallingford and then Waterbury, Connecticut. Her father died when she was a young child and her mother remarried to William Rowley. There is hardly anything known about Phebe. She was probably alive in 1772, when her husband sold land in Waterbury to her step-father. She probably moved with the family to Vermont, and may have been enumerated in her step-son's household in 1790 in South Hero, Vermont.
They had the following children:
4 James Gordon Winters was born on January 29, 1769 in Waterbury, New Haven Co., Connecticut. He died after 1830.

He usually went by his middle name, Gordon. As an adult, he lived in South Hero, Vermont. In the Revolutionary War pension file of Isaac Adams (who married Hannah Fletcher, sister of Obadiah Winters' wife Polly Fletcher), Gordon was listed as having let Isaac use his boat to travel to Burlington, Vermont in 1792. He moved with his family to Canada during the 1790s, where he was living as late as 1802. He had returned to Vermont by 1810. He was enumerated in 1810 in South Hero, Vermont, then in 1820 in Savage Island, Vermont. He was probably the James Winters in 1830 in Peru, New York. Census records suggest that he was probably married and had at least five children. Unfortunately, there is no further record of his family. Some of his children may include those listed below under "unknown father" Winters.

There is as of yet no evidence of James' wife's identity. One researcher's theory is that his wife was a sister of Polly Fletcher (wife of James' half-brother Obadiah Winters). If so, then she was possibly Lorica Fletcher, born in 1771.

5 Silas Winters
6 Naomi Winters was born sometime between 1774-1784, probably in Vermont. She died after 1800.
She married Levi Allen on June 18, 1793 in South Hero, Grande Isle Co., Vermont.
They probably had at least three children, details unknown.
Levi was probably related to Ebenezer Allen, a Revolutionary War hero and the original settler of South Hero. Levi was enumerated as the head of a household in 1800 in South Hero, Vermont. They left no further trace after this and may have moved to Canada in the example of other relatives.
7 unknown Winters was born circa 1777. He died circa 1807-1810, probably in New York
This unidentified Winters man was probably the first husband of Abigail Cannon, the sister of Silas Winters' first wife Jane Cannon. They were married sometime prior to 1807, when she was described as Abigail Winters in her father's estate papers. Abigail was remarried by 1810. Census records indicate that there was probably one surviving male child as a result of this brief union. If Alphonso Winters (1805-1840) was not the son of Silas and Jane Winters, he was probably a result of this union.
8William Winters was born circa 1775-1780, probably in Vermont. He died sometime between 1830-1840, probably in Chenango Co., New York.
He married Abigail Maria Underwood before 1820, probably in Delaware Co., New York. (She was born on January 1, 1797 in Sandisfield, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts. She died after 1840, possibly in Chenango Co., New York.)
They had at least five children:
unknown female Winters (born between 1810-1820)
Betsey Ann Winters (c. 1822-c. 1852)
md. Benjamin Aylesworth
unknown male Winters (born between 1820-1825) - He was possibly Daniel C. Winters, 1825-1892, who eventually settled in Susquehanna Co., Pennsylvania, where Silas Winters and Betsey Winters Aylesworth also lived.
unknown female Winters (born between 1825-1830)
Silas Winters (1828-1911)
md. Mary J. Kelsey
William is placed in this family because he is assumed to have been a close relative (and probably brother) of Silas Winters. Given his age though, he could have been a nephew (son of Obadiah Winters Jr?). He is not found in any known record until the War of 1812, when he served in Delaware County, New York with Silas Winters (possibly his brother). Later during the 1810s, William Winters married Maria Underwood, the niece of Silas Winters' second wife Phebe Phelps. William was living with his family in Tompkins, Delaware County, New York in 1820 and 1828. Sometime after this, he and his family apparently moved to Chenango Co., New York.
8 unknown father Winters
The below list of Winters children were probably grandchildren of Obadiah Winters Sr (born c. 1720), but we don't know who their father is. They could have been children of Obadiah Winters Jr, James Gordon Winters, Silas Winters, or another unidentified son or relative of Obadiah Winters Sr.
James Winters (1790s-after 1830)According to censuses records, he was probably born between 1794 and 1800. James was living in Delaware County, New York in 1820 and 1830. He was married and had at least 7 children in his household. He disappears from Delaware County, New York after 1830. No further information.
Greenleaf Winters (c. 1794-after 1822)

Greenleaf was born in Grand Isle County, Vermont in about 1794. In his youth, he had moved to Delaware County, New York. In 1819, he was convicted of forgery with Silas B. Winters (see below) and sentenced to 10 years in prison. He was pardoned and released in 1822. He left no further trace. He was probably the "Greenlief" Winters living in Greenbush, Wisconsin in 1860 with a wife named Rachael and son Charles (born in Canada). He had probably moved to Canada after his release from prison.

Note: Peter Obadiah Winters (1786-1864), son of Obadiah Winters Jr., had a son named Peter Greenleaf Winters, born in Canada in 1830.

Sally Winters (c. 1796-after 1860)Sally was born in Canada in about 1796 (according to 1850 and 1860 censuses). Sally married Jesse ("Issi") Tripp in 1813 in South Hero, Vermont. They later settled in Ionia County, Michigan (near Silas Winters, born c. 1799). Many researchers have listed her as the daughter of Obadiah Winters Jr and Polly Fletcher, but I think it is more likely she was the daughter of his half-brother James Gordon Winters. Sally had children including: Anne, Harriet, David, Pelina, Silas and Lucinda Tripp.
Silas Bradley Winters (c. 1798-after 1838)He was apparently born in about 1798 in Delaware County, New York. In 1819, in Delaware County, he was convicted of forgery with Greenleaf Winters (see above). He was released from prison in 1823. He apparently moved to Canada after this. He apparently settled in Ancaster (now a part of Hamilton), Ontario, Canada, where died sometime between 1838 and 1861. Probably married to Lydia Bighorn and had children including James, Lydia, Gustavus, Elizabeth and Lillie.
Silas Winters (c. 1799-after 1850)I had previously assumed that he was the same person as Silas Bradley Winters (above), but they were actually different people. This Silas was born circa 1799 in Canada. In 1830, he was living in Malone, New York. In 1840 he was in Clinton County, Michigan. He settled in Ionia County, Michigan before 1844, where he remained (where he lived near Sally Winters Tripp). Married Polly and had children including Sarah, Henry, James, John and Mary.
Almena Winters (c. 1802-1886)

Almena was born in about 1802 in Canada per US census records. She married Jeremiah Hackett in 1818 in South Hero, Vermont. They later lived in New York and Wisconsin. She had at least three children, including Mary P. Hackett King.

Note: the name Almena was repeated frequently in the family. Other Almena's include:
Almena Winters (born 1814), daughter of Silas Winters and Phebe Phelps;
Almena Winters (born c. 1826), daughter of Cotton Winters and Ann Morrison;
Almena Smith (born 1817), daughter of Mary Winters and Erastus Smith.


1st Generation:

Silas Winters was born circa 1772, possibly in Connecticut. He died sometime between 1822 and 1827 in Waterford (now Brooklyn) Twp., Susquehanna Co., Pennsylvania.

Father: Obadiah Winters
Mother: Phebe Gordon

There is no definitive proof of Silas' parentage or ancestry, but the connection to Obadiah and Phebe Winters is likely. Even if he was not the son of Obadiah and Phebe Winters, he was definitely related in some way to that family. The 1800, 1810 and 1820 censuses suggest that Silas was born sometime between 1765 and 1775. Additionally, since Silas apparently took the freeman's oath in South Hero, Vermont in 1793, it suggests he was born in about 1772. If he was born in about 1772, it is also more likely that he was born in Waterbury, Connecticut where his father had sold land in 1772. Additionally, a biography of Silas' grandson (George Squires) refers to him as "Silas Winters of Connecticut", which suggests he was born there. [The census records for Silas' 5 children who were still live in 1880 list his birthplace variously as New York, Connecticut or Vermont.]

In 1772, the family sold their land in Waterbury and apparently moved elsewhere. They may have moved to Vermont at that time. In 1777, they were in Pawlet in Rutland County, Vermont. They may have lived at one time off of Otter Creek in Vermont. In the late 1780s, they settled at South Hero, in what is now Grand Isle County, Vermont. The extended Winters family moved quite frequently. During the mid-1790s, some of the family moved to Canada; while some of the family (including Silas) remained behind in the United States.

In 1793, Silas had taken an oath as a freeman in South Hero. Sometime between 1793 and 1799, Silas moved to Delaware County, New York. In 1799, Silas was taxed for real estate and personal estate in the town of Walton, Delaware County, New York. There, he married Jane Cannon probably in about 1799 or 1800. They lived at what would become the village of Cannonsville in what is now the town of Tompkins, Delaware County, New York. Sadly Jane died within 5 or 6 years of marriage. In about 1807 or 1808, Silas remarried to Phebe Phelps, whose family lived in neighboring Susquehanna County, Pennsylvania.

Silas served in the Delaware County Militia; enlisting in 1805 and absconding (deserting or going into hiding) in 1807. He later served in the War of 1812 out of New York in Farrington's Regiment before deserting from service. It is not clear if this soldier was Silas or another Silas Winters (possibly a nephew). However, this person served in the same regiment with William Winters (brother?) and three of his first wife's brothers (Joseph, Ansel and Dexter Cannon). Sometime between 1812 and 1814, Silas moved with his family to Susquehanna Co., Pennsylvania, where they settled at Waterford (now Brooklyn) Township. Silas probably died here between about 1822 (the approximate year of birth for his youngest child) and 1827 (the approximate year of his widow's remarriage). After his death, Silas' sons apparently returned to New York, and his widow and daughters remained in Pennsylvania.

Silas married first to Jane Cannon in about 1799 in Cannonsville, Delaware Co., New York.

They had the following children:

1 Joseph Cannon Winters
2 Jane Winters was born circa 1805 in Cannonsville, Delaware Co., New York 1. She died after 1820.
3 Alphonzo Winters was born on September 20, 1805 in Cannonsville, Delaware Co., New York 16. He died on September 22, 1840 in Tecumseh, Lenawee Co., Michigan 16. He is buried in the East Cemetery, Clinton, Lenawee Co., Michigan.
He married Sarah Clawson Hyde on April 23, 1835 in Southport, Chemung Co., New York 16.
They had the following children:
Mary Elizabeth Winters (1836-1838)
Sarah Eliza Winters (1836-1912)
md. 1st. Uriel Pierce
md. 2nd. Andrew J. Bozard
George Lewis Winters (1838-1889)
md. Margaret Zeviah Pierce
Alphonso Oristes Winters (1841-1916)
md. Sarah J. Ely

There is no proof that Alphonso was Silas' son, but the relationship is likely. If he was not their son, he was probably the son of an unknown Mr. Winters (probably Silas' brother) and Abigail Cannon, sister of Silas' wife Jane Cannon.

Alphonzo was born in Cannonsville and "was for many years a resident of Cannonsville". Then at some point in his youth, he moved to Southport, Chemung County, New York. There, he was married to Sarah Hyde in 1835. In about 1836, they moved west to Tecumseh, Lenawee County, Michigan; where Alphonzo died in 1840 at the age of 35. Afterwards, his widow returned with her children to New York and she remarried. Alphonzo was a farmer and also engaged in "lumbering" in Michigan.

Silas married second to Phebe Phelps in 1807 or 1808. She was born on October 29, 1785 in Granby, Tolland Co., Connecticut 2. She died after 1850.
After Silas' death, Phebe remarried to Joseph McKune in about 1827 and moved with her children to Harmony Township, Susquehanna co., Pennsylvania; where she lived for many years. Phebe may have moved to Wisconsin with her youngest daughter (Julia McKune, daughter from her second marriage) and died there before 1860.
They had the following children:
1 Phebe Winters was born on February 24, 1809 2. She died on June 1, 1846 in Lanesboro, Susquehanna Co., Pennsylvania 2. She is buried in the McKune Cemetery, Susquehanna Co., Pennsylvania.
She married Nathaniel Squires in about 1825 in Susquehanna Co., Pennsylvania. (He was born on October 15, 1792 in Morris, Camden Co., New Jersey 2 and died on February 23, 1877 in Nicholson, Wyoming Co., Pennsylvania 2. He is buried in the Stark Cemetery, Nicholson, Wyoming Co., Pennsylvania.)
They had the following children:
Silas Winters Squires (1826-1906)
md. Lydia Brush
George Washington Squires (1828-1907)
md. Harriet Estabrook
Frances Emeline Squires (1830-1880s)
md. Simpson Drake
Charlotte W. Squires (1833-1885)
md. N.C. Whitcomb
Imogene Squires (1837-1870's)
md. Talcott C. Banks
Zenophon Squires (1840-1845)
Alphonzo Squires (1844-1844)
2 Frances A. Winters was born on May 22, 1810 in Delaware Co., New York 18. She died on April 21, 1884 in Columbus Twp., Bartholomew Co., Indiana 4. She is buried in the Columbus City Cemetery, Columbus, Bartholomew Co., Indiana.
She married Benjamin Comfort on May 12, 1829 in Harmony Twp., Susquehanna Co., Pennsylvania 2. (He was born on May 15, 1805 in Deerpark, Orange Co., New York 2 and died on January 25, 1883 in Columbus Twp., Bartholomew Co., Indiana 4. He is buried in the Columbus City Cemetery, Columbus, Bartholomew Co., Indiana.)
They had the following children:
Lydia Ann Comfort (1830-1830)
Louise Comfort (c. 1833-1840s)
Harriet Frances Comfort (c. 1840-1891)
md. Richard J. Thomas

Frances and her family lived for many years in Harmony Township, Susequehanna County, Pennsylvania. Sometime during the mid-1860s, they moved out west to Bartholomew County, Indiana, where they remained. Benjamin was a blacksmith in Pennsylvania. In Columbus, Indiana, he was a dry goods merchant.

3 Eliza Ann Winters was born in 1812 in Delaware Co., New York 17. She died on April 30, 1899 in Oakland, Susquehanna Co., Pennsylvania 27. She is buried in the McKune Cemetery, Susquehanna Co., Pennsylvania.
She married Elisha Squires in 1837 in Susquehanna Co., Pennsylvania 17. (He was born on about 1813 in New York 3 and died before March 19, 1867 in Susquehanna Co., Pennsylvania. He is buried in the McKune Cemetery, Susquehanna Co., Pennsylvania.)
They had one child:
Stanley W. Squires (1843-1918)
md. Delia

Before her marriage, Eliza had some kind of involvement with Mormon founders Joseph Smith and Martin Harris, who also lived in Harmony, Pennsylvania. According to one unproven allegation, Joseph Smith had attempted to seduce Eliza (at some point between 1827 and 1829), and colluded with Martin Harris about the seduction attempt. Later, in 1832, Martin Harris apparently publicly declared that Eliza had given birth to a bastard child. She responded by suing him for slander, but lost the case.

4 Almena Winters was born on July 2, 1814 in Waterford (now Brooklyn) Twp., Susquehanna Co., Pennsylvania 5. She died on June 25, 1893 in Grant Co., Wisconsin 25.
She married Benajah Munson on October 30, 1833 in Susquehanna Co., Pennsylvania 5. (He was born on June 10, 1805 in Pennsylvania 5 and died on January 9, 1885 in Grant Co., Wisconsin 5.
They had the following children:
Lucy Jane Munson (1835-1906)
md. Warren Shubael Dimock
Amasa T. Munson (1838-1862)
Elsie Munson (1842-1872)
md. Horace F. Perkins
Esther Munson (1842-1906)
md. Andrew S. Leonard

Almena and her husband continued living in Susquehanna Co., Pennsylvania after their marriage. Sometime during the 1850s, they moved out west to Wisconsin. In Wisconsin, they lived in Iowa County, then Grant County. Benajah worked as a farmer.

5 Polly Winters was born on November 18, 1816 in Waterford (now Brooklyn) Twp., Susquehanna Co., Pennsylvania 2. She died on June 26, 1915 in Des Moines, Polk Co., Iowa 2. She is buried in the Graceland Cemetery, Webster City, Hamilton Co., Iowa.
She married Jacob Skinner in October 1832 in Lanesboro, Pennsylvania 2. He was born on January 31, 1809 in Orange Co., New York and died on January 1, 1882 in Webster City, Hamilton Co., Iowa. He is buried in the Graceland Cemetery, Webster City, Hamilton Co., Iowa.
They had the following children:
Elisha Williams Skinner (1834-1906)
md. Clara Gertrude Turner
George Jefferson Skinner (c. 1836-1899)
md. Zeruiah Maria Johnson
Panthea Skinner (c. 1838-1853)
Orban E. Skinner (c. 1840-c. 1840)
Helen E. Skinner (c. 1843-1875)
md. Warren Irving Worthington
Phebe E. Skinner (1847-1939)
md. Andrew S. Bonner
Marion F. Skinner (1850-1852)
Marion D. Skinner (1853-1917)
Maynette Skinner (1856-aft. 1900)
md. 1st Lewis G. Legg
md. 2nd Eli Bundy Dawson
Charles Jacob Skinner (1859-1934)
md. Amy M. Legg

Polly and her husband lived in Susquehanna Co., Pennsylvania after their marriage. Sometime between 1847 and 1850, they moved out west to Wisconsin; where they settled in Palmyra in Jefferson County. Then sometime between 1858 and 1860, they moved to Webster City, Iowa; where they remained for many years. Polly continued living in Webster City, but sometime in her old age (before 1910), she moved to Des Moines, Iowa to live in a "home for the aged", where she died.

6 unknown female Winters was born circa 1818 in Delaware Co., New York. She died after 1830.
7 unknown female Winters was born circa 1820 in Susquehanna Co., Pennsylvania. She died after 1830.
8 Clarissa Winters was born circa 1822 in Susquehanna Co., Pennsylvania 3. She died after 1860.
She married George William Lake on September 8, 1842 in Harmony Twp., Susquehanna Co., Pennsylvania 2.
They had the following children:
Delmer Lake (1843-1906)
md. Esther E. Millard
Comfort D. Lake (1844-1918)
George Lake (c. 1847-???)
Imogene Lake (c. 1855-???)
Possibly Imogene R. Lake who married Delavan A. Holmes

There is no proof that the Clarissa Winters who married George Lake was the daughter of Silas and Phebe Winters; but the connection is likely. The citation for her marriage in 1842 indicates that C. Winters married George Lane (not Lake). It is likely though that this was a typo and she was really married to George Lake. First, the names of two of her children (Comfort and Imogene) were very unusual and were repeated between the two families. Additionally, Clarissa's son Delmer Lake moved out west and lived in Webster City, Iowa, near Polly Winters Skinner (daughter of Silas and Phebe Winters). Finally, in 1895, Delmer Lake's household included Frank (female) Perkins, the granddaughter of Almena Winters Munson (another daughter of Silas and Phebe Winters).

In 1850, Clarissa's family was living in Susquehanna Co., Pennsylvania. In 1860, they were living in Luzerne Co., Pennsylvania. There is no further record of Clarissa or her husband after that date. However, sometime between 1860 and 1862, her sons Delmer and Comfort had moved west to Iowa (where Clarissa's sisters Polly was living). Her daughter Imogene also eventually moved to Iowa. Clarissa had probably died sometime between 1860 and 1870, probably in Pennsylvania or Iowa.


2nd Generation:

Joseph Cannon Winters was born circa 1803 in what is now Tompkins, Delaware County, New York 1,3. He died on April 28, 1881 in Cannonsville, Delaware Co., New York 1. He is buried in the Oakwood Cemetery, Stilesville, Delaware Co., New York.

Father: Silas Winters
Mother: Jane Cannon

As far as I know, there is no contemporary evidence that Joseph was the son of Silas Winters and Jane Cannon. Joseph was named after his maternal grandfather, Joseph Cannon. He spent the first part of his life in or near the village of Cannonsville, Delaware County, New York. Joseph's mother died when he was young and his father remarried to Phebe Phelps. Joseph had one younger brother and at least nine younger sisters. In about 1813, Joseph and his family moved over the state line to what is now Brooklyn Township, Susquehanna County, Pennsylvania. Joseph continued living there with his family.

In about 1824, Joseph reached his majority and it was also at about this time that his father died. It was mostly likely then that he moved by himself back to his hometown of Cannonsville, New York. He was married soon after to a young woman named Maria Brower, whose family lived nearby. They lived together on a farm in the town of Tompkins (where Cannonsville is located) in Delaware County. There is a strong possibility that in the mid-to-late-1830s, Joseph and his family lived briefly in Michigan. Most likely, he was the Joseph C. Winters who was one of the "earliest settlers" of Vienna Township, Genesee County, Michigan (the period of earliest settlement of the township appears to have been between 1833 and 1838). Joseph's move to Michigan most likely coincides with when Alphonso Winters (who was most likely his brother) moved to Lenawee County, Michigan - in 1836 or 1837. If Joseph did move to Michigan, he did not stay there long and returned to Delaware County, New York by 1840. In that year, he and his family were living in Davenport, Delaware County, New York, and were enumerated next to Joseph's brother-in-law Andrew Smith. Perhaps they had just recently returned to New York and were living with relatives until they could get back on their own feet. Sometime during the 1840s, Joseph and his family returned to the town of Tompkins, Delaware County, where they remained. In 1864, Joseph purchased a home in the village of Cannonsville, Delaware County. His wife Maria died in 1864. Joseph married twice more after the death of his first wife, but had no more children. He probably would have helped to raise his 5 step-children by his second wife: Sanford, Amos, Paulina, George, and Silas Cable; and 2 step-daughters by his third wife: Jennie and Mary Bailey.

Joseph was a farmer and probably a member of the Presbyterian or Baptist church in Cannonsville. On May 6, 1879, Joseph wrote his will, in which he provided some financial support for his wife Martha and left the rest of his estate to his surviving children. Joseph died on April 28, 1881 and his will was proven on May 23, 1881. He was buried in the Cannonsville Cemetery, Cannonsville, New York. In the 1960's, his body was exhumed along with those of all his family and reburied at the Oakwood Cemetery in nearby Stilesville, New York. Today, the physical locations that Joseph spent the majority of his life are at the bottom of the Cannonsville Reservoir.

He married first to Maria Brower in about 1826 in Delaware Co., New York.

They had the following children:
1 Eliza Ann Winters was born in March 1827 in Tompkins, Delaware Co., New York 3. She died on June 27, 1903 in Milo, Yates Co., New York 24. She is buried in the Milo Center Cemetery, Milo, Yates Co., New York.
She married David Millard St. John in about 1855 in New York 3. (He was born on December 22, 1819 in Otsego, Otsego Co., New York 2. He died on December 12, 1906 in Milo, Yates Co., New York 24. He is buried in the Milo Center Cemetery, Milo, Yates Co., New York.)
They had the following children:
Catherine M. St. John (1856-1901)
md. David Heller
George L. St. John (1859-1915)
Jay C. St. John (1862-1927)
md. Ivona
Eliza was named after aunts on both sides of her family; her parents both had sisters named "Eliza Ann". David was the widower of Eliza's deceased aunt Catherine Brower. They lived near Breesport, Chemung County, New York. Sometime between 1880 and 1892, they moved to Milo, New York.
2 Alphonzo Winters
3 George Winters was born on August 18, 1830 in Tompkins, Delaware Co., New York 6. He died in 1918 in Cannonsville, Delaware Co., New York. He is buried in the Oakwood Cemetery, Stilesville, Delaware Co., New York.
He married Mary Jane Cannon on October 20, 1858 26 in Delaware Co., New York. (She was born on June 3, 1835 in Cannonsville, Delaware Co., New York 6 and died on November 2, 1891 in Cannonsville, Delaware Co., New York 6. She is buried in the Oakwood Cemetery, Stilesville, Delaware Co., New York.)
They had no children.
4 Harriet M. Winters was born in June 1836 3 probably in Michigan. She died on August 14, 1900 in Elmira, Chemung Co., New York 22. She is buried in the Scotchtown Cemetery, Erin, Chemung Co., New York.
She married first to an unknown Mr. Blackwell, probably before 1855. He died sometime between 1863-1865.
They had at least one child:
Joseph Judge Blackwell (1863-1943)
md. Harriet Bell Hamilton
There were apparently three additional children that died young.
She was married second Isaac Wood sometime between 1863 and 1865, probably in New York. (He was born in 1828 in Pennsylvania 7 and died in 1896 in Erin, Chemung Co., New York 7. He is buried in the Scotchtown Cemetery, Erin, Chemung Co., New York.)
They had the following children:
Anna E. Wood (1865-1959)
md. Charles Moore
Andrew Wood (1867-1948)
md. Cora Marilla Elston
Arba Wood (1869-1870)
Clara Ida Wood (1870-1953)
md. Patrick Halpin
Edith Wood (1874-1946)
Floyd Isaac Wood (1874-1938)
md. Deborah May Hollenbeck
Wells Frank Wood (1876-1948)
md. 1st. Jessie C.
md. 2nd. Veva Geneva

Harriet was probably born in Genesee County, Michigan, during the brief period that her family lived there. Other sources though indicate she was born in Delaware County, New York, where she was raised.

Harriet was most likely married to her first husband before 1855, since she is absent from her family in the enumeration of the 1855 census. I have so far been unable to identify her first husband or determine their whereabouts during their marriage. All we know is that her surviving son from that marriage, named Joseph Blackwell, was born in 1863 in Pennsylvania. Although the names do not match, it is possible that her first husband was James Black. James and Harriet Black were living together in Cannonsville, Delaware County, New York in 1855. Sometime after this, they moved to nearby Wayne County, Pennsylvania; where James was a farmer and laborer. James served in the Civil War while living in Pennsylvania and died in 1863 or 1864.

After the death of her husband, Harriet apparently went to Chemung County, New York where her sister Eliza was living and where her brother James also settled. There, she met and married her second husband. After their marriage, lived near Breesport in the town of Erin, New York. After Isaac's death, Harriet moved to the city of Elmira, New York; where she died.

5 James Edgar* Winters was born in August 1839 3 in Michigan or Delaware Co., New York. He died in 1918 in Elmira, Chemung Co., New York 8. He is buried in the Maple Grove Cemetery, Horseheads, Chemung Co., New York.
He married Louisa Jane in about 1865. (She was born in September 1841 in New York 3 and died on May 20, 1914 in Elmira, Chemung Co., New York 8. She is buried in the Maple Grove Cemetery, Horseheads, Chemung Co., New York.)
They had the following children:
Mildred A. Winters (1865-1929)
md. Yuba Randall
Joseph E. Winters (1868-1953)
md. 1st. Julia
md. 2nd. Ada M.
Laura B. Winters (1885-1970)
md. George Washington Carson

James first settled near his family in Delware County, New York. Sometime between 1864 and 1866, he moved to Chemung County, New York, where he remained. In Chemung County, he lived in both Erin and Horseheads town, before moving to the city of Elmira in his old age.

* James' middle name is listed as both Edgar and Edward in contemporary records.

6 Andrew B. Winters was born circa 1842 in Tompkins, Delaware Co., New York 3. He died on November 20, 1865 in Cannonsville, Delaware Co., New York 6. He is buried in the Oakwood Cemetery, Stilesville, Delaware Co., New York.
Andrew served in the Civil War out of New York. He mustered out on June 8, 1865. He died five months later of unknown causes. A few researchers have proposed that his middle name was Brewer (Brower).
Joseph married second to Sarah Ann Woodbeck, widow of Lewis Cable, in 1864 (sometime between January and October), probably in Delaware Co., New York. She was born in about February 1824 in New York 6. She died on May 31, 1871 in Cannonsville, Delaware Co., New York 6. She is buried in the Oakwood Cemetery, Stilesville, Delaware Co., New York.
They had no children.

Joseph married third to Martha P. Scofield, widow of Francis Bailey, sometime between 1871 and 1875. She was born on March 10, 1838 in Pennsylvania 19. She died in 1894 6. She is buried in the Oakwood Cemetery, Stilesville, Delaware Co., New York.

They had no children.

After Joseph's death, Martha married Luther Haynes.


3rd Generation:

Alphonzo Winters was born on September 24, 1828 in Tompkins, Delaware County, New York 6,11. He died on March 2, 1911 in Cannonsville, Delaware Co., New York 6,12. He is buried in the Oakwood Cemetery, Stilesville, Delaware Co., New York.

Father: Joseph Cannon Winters
Mother: Maria Brower

Alphonzo Winters was probably named after his uncle (Alphonzo Winters, 1805-1840). He spent the majority of his youth in the town of Tompkins in Delaware County, New York, where the family probably lived in the vicinity of Cannonsville. In the mid-1830s, the family moved to Genesee County, Michigan. They did not remain there long and returned to Delaware County by 1840. In 1840, they were living in the town of Davenport, New York, probably on land owned by his maternal aunt, Eliza Smith. After this, his family moved back to the town of Tompkins where they rented land southeast of the village of Cannonsville. In 1847, at the age of 19, he began working as a farm laborer for neighboring farmers in the vicinity. In 1850, he was living on the farm of the Seymour family, just outside of Cannonsville. Meanwhile, Alphonzo began saving money to purchase a farm that could support a family.

Alphonzo eventually began a relationship with a young woman from the village of Cannonsville named Jane Owens. In September of 1854, he and Jane Owens were married in Cannonsville. During the first year of marriage, they probably lived in a rented home in the vicinity. In November 1851, Alphonzo had purchased 286 acres in Tompkins for $300.00. Then in May 1855, he purchased 90 acres of land with a house and farm for $1,000.00. He and his family lived on this farm from 1855 until 1866. The farm was on the south bank of the West Branch of the Delaware River, about 2 or 3 miles east of the village of Cannonsville. In 1861, he sold 96 of his acres to his father Joseph Winters. On his farm, Alphonzo's crops included hay, oats, buckwheat, Indian corn, potatoes, beans and apples. He also kept cows for butter and sheep for wool. Meanwhile, Alphonzo was apparently saving money from the farm to engage in other pursuits. In March 1866, Alphonzo purchased two separate lots in the village of Cannonsville for $2,000.00. One of those lots apparently contained a shop and the other contained a house. The family likely moved there at that time and Alphonzo opened up a general store business in the shop. Another source suggests though that they moved to Cannonsville in 1864. Then, in June 1866, Alphonzo sold the remainder of his farm for $2,500.00. In 1868, Alphonzo was given a store license.

Alphonzo and his wife spent the remainder of their lives residing in the village of Cannonsville. Alphonzo successfully operated his general store business in the center of the village for over 40 years. In fact, he was still operating the business at the time he died at the age of 82 in 1911. The family were probably members of the Baptist church in town. Alphonzo frequently served as a grand juror. In 1878, he was elected as Town Clerk for the town of Tompkins. Alphonzo's wife Jane died in 1908 and later that year he wrote his will, in which he provided $100.00 to erect a tombstone for him and his wife. He also left $200 to his son George, $100 to each of his five grandchildren, and the residue of his estate to his three children. In 1910, Alphonzo was living with a widow named Mary Gregory. The extent of their relationship is unknown, but she had been his next door neighbor during the 1850s and 1860s. Alphonzo and his wife were buried in the Cannonsville Cemetery. In the early 1960s, their bodies were exhumed and reburied at the Oakwood Cemetery in Stilesville in anticipation of the flooding of the valley and creation of the Cannonsville Reservoir.

He married Mary Jane Owens on September 7, 1854 in Cannonsville, Delaware Co., New York 11,13.

They had the following children:
1 Gordon Owens Winters was born on October 29, 1855 in Cannonsville, Delaware Co., New York 11. He died on September 10, 1918 in Cannonsville, Delaware Co., New York 12. He is buried in the Oakwood Cemetery, Stilesville, Delaware Co., New York.
He married Katherine L. Colvin in about 1883 in Delaware Co., New York 3. (She was born in October 1857 in Masonville, Delaware Co., New York 3 and died on March 11, 1951 in Binghamton, Broome Co., New York 20. She is buried in the Oakwood Cemetery, Stilesville, Delaware Co., New York.)
They had no children.
Gordon and Katherine lived in the area of Cannonsville, New York, for the duration of their lives. Gordon worked as a laborer in various occupations. Before her marriage, Katherine "Kate" worked as a school teacher. After Gordon died, she worked as a newspaper reporter.
2 George Comfort Winters was born on June 28, 1858 in Cannonsville, Delaware Co., New York 11. He died on April 14, 1931 in Delaware Co., New York 23. He is buried in the Oakwood Cemetery, Stilesville, Delaware Co., New York.
He married Sarah P. Swartout on June 16, 1886 in Cannonsville, Delaware Co., New York 12. (She was born on September 18, 1862 in Hancock, Delaware Co., New York 21 and died on March 23, 1944 in Romney, Hampshire Co., West Virginia 21. She is buried in the Oakwood Cemetery, Stilesville, Delaware Co., New York.)
They had the following children:
Harley Everett Winters (1886-1960)
md. Ida Erma Schmidt
Frances E. Winters (1888-1984)
md. Ernest Michael Cordray
Fredrick Alfonso Winters (1893-1942)
md. Hattie Pearl Tennant

George was postmaster of Cannonsville, New York from 1886 to 1889. Sometime between 1889 and 1892 he moved with his family to West Virginia, where he worked as an oil pumper. In West Virginia, they lived for many years in or near the small town of Core. Sometime during the 1920s, they moved to Morgantown, West Virginia. Then during the early 1930s, they returned to Delaware County, New York, where they settled at Fish's Eddy (near Hancock). In her old age, Sarah moved to Romney, West Virginia to live with her daughter Frances.

3 Charlotte Frances Winters

4th Generation:

Charlotte Frances Winters was born on January 25, 1861* in Cannonsville, Delaware County, New York 11. She died on February 14, 1924 in Brooklyn, Kings Co., New York 15. Her remains are interred at US Columbarium, Middle Village, Queens Co., New York.

Father: Alphonzo Winters
Mother: Mary Jane Owens

She was named after her maternal grandmother, Charlotte Huyck Owens. She usually went by the pet name "Lottie." Although family history records her birth in Cannonsville, in actuality, she was probably born on the family farm which was in the rural town of Tompkins, about 2 or 3 miles east of Cannonsville. Charlotte lived with her family on their rural farm until 1866. In 1866, they sold their farm and purchased two lots in the village of Cannonsville. They began living there at the time and her father also opened a general store in the village, which he successfully operated for over 40 years until his death in 1911. Another source suggests that they actually moved to Cannonsville in 1864 11. In Cannonsville, the family were probably members of the Baptist church in town. Charlotte and her siblings most likely attended the school that was in the village. It can be assumed that Charlotte worked in the family store after finishing her education. It may have been while working there that she met a young man named Oscar Wadleigh who briefly lived in the nearby town of Franklin in 1885 or 1886. He then moved to Cherry Creek, several hundred miles away in western New York, sometime before July 1886. By that time though, they had developed a relationship and eventually became engaged. In October 1886, Charlotte was described as his "lady friend" when he took her on a trip to visit his parents in New Hampshire. They were married on November 17, 1887 at her parents' home in Cannonsville, New York.

Afterwards, they moved to Buffalo, New York where Oscar had acquired a job. They lived in Buffalo from 1887 to 1892 where they rented at least three different homes. Charlotte apparently traveled back to Cannonsville to give birth to her oldest child in her parents' home, in August 1888. In the summer of 1892, Charlotte and her family moved to Deposit, Delaware County, New York, where Oscar purchased and began operating a newspaper. A son Gerald was born there in 1893. They did not remain in Deposit for long. In 1895 or 1896, they moved to Binghamton, Broome County, New York. In Binghamton, they rented at least five different homes before they purchased a house at 80 Mary Street in 1907. Eventually, Oscar's work compelled them to move yet again. In 1912, they moved to Brooklyn in New York City. Then in 1914, they moved to the Woodhaven neighborhood of Queens where they purchased a house. Strangely, their house in Queens was purchased separately by Charlotte and was legally in her name. Charlotte died at the Peck Memorial Hospital in Brooklyn from the effects of pneumonia on February 14, 1924. She was 63 years old. Afterwards she was cremated and her remains were interred at the US Columbarium at Fresh Pond Crematorium in Queens.

Surviving records infer that one of Charlotte's passions was singing. She was apparently a very talented soprano, and put her talent to use singing for church choirs for most of her adulthood. It also seems that she played the violin in her adulthood. As an adult, Charlotte was a member of the Jolly Mystic Club (some sort of social organization) and of the Magnolia Chapter of the Order of the Eastern Star (female version of the Masons). Her son Odin's diary from 1906 has survived, which contains several references to Charlotte. Charlotte appears to have been very close to her son Odin, often taking him out shopping, going on walks with him, or constantly writing letters to him after he moved away. Throughout 1906, she and Oscar frequently went to dances and other social events together. Charlotte apparently traveled frequently. During the year 1906, she had traveled at different times to Cannonsville, Sidney, and Buffalo, New York.

* There are discrepancies about Charlotte's date of birth. Munsell's 1880 History of Delaware County records her birth date as January 25, 1861. All census records before her marriage (1865, 1870, 1875, 1880) support an 1861 year of birth. Then, all census records after her marriage (1892, 1900, 1905, 1910, 1920) support much later years of birth, in the 1860s or 1870s. On her death certificate as well as information handed down to her descendants, her date of birth is recorded as January 25, 1863. It appears that there being no proof or record of her 1861 birth, Charlotte lied about her birth date to make herself appear younger. She may have felt pressure to do this because her husband Oscar was four years younger than her.

She married Oscar Stearns Wadleigh on November 17, 1887 in Cannonsville, Delaware Co., New York 12.
For information on her children, see his page.

Sources:

1. LDS Ancestral File
2. Online gedcom family files
3. Assorted US federal census records
4. Indiana Deaths, 1882-1920, (ancestry.com)
5. Munson, Myron A. The Munson Record. New Haven, CT: Munson Assoc., 1895.
6. Tombstone inscriptions, Oakwood Cemetery, Stilesville, Delaware Co., NY.
7. Online cemetery index, Scotchtown Cemetery, Erin, Chemung Co., NY.
8. Online cemetery index, Maple Grove Cemetery, Elmira, Chemung Co., NY.
9. Baptism Records of Reformed Church of Claverack, NY, (ancestry.com)
10. Death Notice of Maria Winters, Bloomville Mirror, February 9, 1864.
11. Munsell, W.W. The History of Delaware County. W.W. Munsell & Co., New York, NY, 1880.
12. Vital records of Tompkins, Delaware Co., NY. Transcribed by Frances Webb, Town Clerk.
13. Matrimonial notice, Bloomville Mirror, September 1854.
14. Online cemetery index, Cannonsville Cemetery, Cannonsville, NY.
15. Death Certificate of Charlotte Wadleigh, New York City, NY, 1924.
16. Walworth, Reuben H. Hyde Genealogy. J. Munsell, Albany, NY, 1864. 17. Stocker, Rhamanthas M. Centennial History of Susquehanna County, Pennsylvania. R. T. Peck, Philadelphia, PA, 1887.
18. Online gedcom family file of chan83@stny.rr.com
19. Potts, William J. Historical Collections Relating to the Potts Family in Great Britain and America .... Canonsburg, PA, 1901.
20. Obituary of Katherine Winters, Binghamton Press, Mar. 13, 1951, Pg. 20
21. Death register, Hampshire Co., WV, Vol 4 Pg 34, West Virginia Archives and History
22. Obituary of Harriet M. Wood, Elmira Daily Gazette and Free Press, Aug. 15, 1900.
23. General Index to Wills and Proceedings, 1797-1963. Surrogate's Court, Delaware County, New York.
24. Online cemetery index, Milo Center Cemetery, Milo, NY. http://www.yatescounty.org
25. Wisconsin Deaths, 1820-1907. Ancestry.com
26. Handwritten Cannon family history, Deposit Historical Society, Deposit, NY.
27. Obituary of Eliza Squires, Tri-Weekly Journal, May 2, 1899.